Monthly Archives: August 2012

An interesting cloud computing face-off

… Google Drive is exactly what Google fans have been looking for: a place to store all of your Google stuff. It syncs to your computer effortlessly, but Dropbox already does that. So where does it beat Dropbox? Since Drive replaces and builds on Google Docs, it’s essentially a full-featured cloud document editing and storage suite. Dropbox is still the champ at syncing since it’s so reliable and on so many platforms, but if you’re looking for the best way to collaborate with others using online documents, Drive is the way to go. If you’re looking for the ability to sync and also backup multiple folders around your computer, SugarSync is head and shoulders above the rest.
At the end of the day, Google Drive is exactly what Google fans have been looking for: a place to store all of your Google stuff. It syncs to your computer effortlessly, but Dropbox already does that. So where does it beat Dropbox? Since Drive replaces and builds on Google Docs, it’s essentially a full-featured cloud document editing and storage suite. Dropbox is still the champ at syncing since it’s so reliable and on so many platforms, but if you’re looking for the best way to collaborate with others using online documents, Drive is the way to go. If you’re looking for the ability to sync and also backup multiple folders around your computer, SugarSync is head and shoulders above the rest.
No one sync solution is perfect, so we attempted to give a fair shot to every mainstream app we’ve heard of and could find online. So, we wanted to provide explanations for why two mainstream options were not included in our list. First,JungleDisk was not included primarily because there is no free way to use the service, and we’ve compared services that you can use free of charge (like Google Drive). The least expensive option is $3/month, which includes 5GB of storage — a lot compared to other services we looked at. Additionally, most of the apps we checked out offer mobile apps that have been updated recently, while JungleDisk’s iOS app has not been updated since August 2010, almost two years ago.
Another option we skipped is AeroFS, a very cool new company that lets you “sync” files between computers as long as both computers are turned on. LogMeIn’s Cubby provides a similar feature, but also includes traditional “sync to the cloud” capabilities, a baseline feature for our comparison. Thus, AeroFS, which cannot sync your files to “the cloud,” was not included.
A third detail we want to mention has to do with the criteria we used to judge these apps. We didn’t provide each app with a Verge Score, but did measure them in terms of criteria we came up with, which we submitted to each sync app’s parent company. Data from our charts is a combination of points we deduced from using the apps and points we gathered from responses to the criteria we submitted to each company.
Also, a few clarifications:
Multiple folder sync: the ability to sync multiple folders outside of your primary sync folder. For example, SugarSync allows you to pick folders around your computer to sync, while Dropbox does not.
Download to mobile: “pin” files to mobile for offline use on all mobile platforms
Password-protected files: whether links you send out to others can be password-protected or not. Clearly all of these services offer password protection for accessing all of your files.
Bandwidth-throttling: this is a negative attribute, and corresponds to companies that admitted to throttling bandwidth when you upload large amounts of files.
(originally posted at The Verge)

An interesting cloud computing face-off

Dropbox, vTiger CRM


Google Drive is exactly what Google fans have been looking for: a place to store all of your Google stuff. It syncs to your computer effortlessly, but Dropbox already does that. So where does it beat Dropbox? Since Drive replaces and builds on Google Docs, it’s essentially a full-featured cloud document editing and storage suite. Dropbox is still the champ at syncing since it’s so reliable and on so many platforms, but if you’re looking for the best way to collaborate with others using online documents, Drive is the way to go. If you’re looking for the ability to sync and also backup multiple folders around your computer, SugarSync is head and shoulders above the rest.
At the end of the day, Google Drive is exactly what Google fans have been looking for: a place to store all of your Google stuff. It syncs to your computer effortlessly, but Dropbox already does that. So where does it beat Dropbox? Since Drive replaces and builds on Google Docs, it’s essentially a full-featured cloud document editing and storage suite. Dropbox is still the champ at syncing since it’s so reliable and on so many platforms, but if you’re looking for the best way to collaborate with others using online documents, Drive is the way to go. If you’re looking for the ability to sync and also backup multiple folders around your computer, SugarSync is head and shoulders above the rest.
No one sync solution is perfect, so we attempted to give a fair shot to every mainstream app we’ve heard of and could find online. So, we wanted to provide explanations for why two mainstream options were not included in our list. First,JungleDisk was not included primarily because there is no free way to use the service, and we’ve compared services that you can use free of charge (like Google Drive). The least expensive option is $3/month, which includes 5GB of storage — a lot compared to other services we looked at. Additionally, most of the apps we checked out offer mobile apps that have been updated recently, while JungleDisk’s iOS app has not been updated since August 2010, almost two years ago.
Another option we skipped is AeroFS, a very cool new company that lets you “sync” files between computers as long as both computers are turned on. LogMeIn‘s Cubby provides a similar feature, but also includes traditional “sync to the cloud” capabilities, a baseline feature for our comparison. Thus, AeroFS, which cannot sync your files to “the cloud,” was not included.
A third detail we want to mention has to do with the criteria we used to judge these apps. We didn’t provide each app with a Verge Score, but did measure them in terms of criteria we came up with, which we submitted to each sync app’s parent company. Data from our charts is a combination of points we deduced from using the apps and points we gathered from responses to the criteria we submitted to each company.
Also, a few clarifications:
Multiple folder sync: the ability to sync multiple folders outside of your primary sync folder. For example, SugarSync allows you to pick folders around your computer to sync, while Dropbox does not.
Download to mobile: “pin” files to mobile for offline use on all mobile platforms
Password-protected files: whether links you send out to others can be password-protected or not. Clearly all of these services offer password protection for accessing all of your files.
Bandwidth-throttling: this is a negative attribute, and corresponds to companies that admitted to throttling bandwidth when you upload large amounts of files.
(originally posted at The Verge)

Evolutivo vtApps

Infrastructure and goals

The intention of the vtApps extension is to make it easy for developers to create small tools, informative dashboards and similar applications that tap into the information and power of vtiger CRM without having to go through all the hassle of new vtlib modules. At the same time we strive to create an environment where these simple apps can live and work together.
We have developed this framework based on jquery and on the [kendoui toolkit|http://kendoui.com/], so all vtApps directly inherit this infrastructure and can use any part of it in their solutions, but all vtApps live inside vtiger CRM and have full access to all the information that the application has and also to all the code and tools vtiger CRM gives us.
Our ultimate goal is to completely substitute the current dashboard with equivalent vtApps to the boxes we have now, and add a full set of new services and information vtApps that will grow inside the vtApps framework.

User Guide

From the users point of view the vtApps extension is very simple to use as it is really an infrastructure to make it easy for developers to offer simple solutions, encapsulated in windows. Each of these applications will have their own functionality and user requirements, which each user will have to learn to get the most out of the vtApp.
So here we will be talking about the base functionality and user experience that is needed to work with the vtApps extension.
Accessing vtApps is just like accessing any other vtiger CRM module, clicking on the menu link that can be found in Analytics will take us to the vtApp Canvas. On the canvas we will find an ordered list of vtApp icons. Each icon represents an individual application.
Hovering the mouse over any icon will show us a short description of the intended functionality of the vtApp.
All the icons, except the Trash can be sorted by simply dragging the icon to the desired position. The trash can will always be the last vtApp in the list.
Clicking on the icon of the vtApp will open a window, within which we will be able to see the execution of the vtApp. Each window has a series of base functionality. They can be resized and moved. Most will have a refresh button to execute the vtApp again without having to close and open the window, and some will also have an edit button that will open an additional window with setting options that will affect the behavior of the vtApp. Both the contents of the vtApp and of it’s related edit settings window are totally dependent on the functionality of the vtApp.
Each user will be able to order and position his windows to his likings and the configuration will be saved so when he returns he will find all in it’s place.
To uninstall a vtApp just drag the icon to the trash can. Once a vtApp has been eliminate it cannot be recovered. You would have to install it again. vtApps can be hidden for certain users by the administrator using the vtApps Configurator

Disclaimer

vtApps does not pretend to be a secure environment, we do not impose any restrictions on the vtApps possibilities, just as anyone can send you a vtiger CRM module that you can install in your vtiger CRM and have it do anything to your information, also a vtApp has full access to all the information contained inside your vtiger CRM and the vtApp can do anything with it. Although we will strive to evaluate and respond to all suspicious code conducts we probably won’t have time to go through all the code of all the vtApps, so the full responsibility of the acts of any vtApp is beyond our control. You will install vtApps at your own risk.
If you are interested in trying a demo of the vtApps send an email to info@evolutivo.it